Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story collections and two non-fiction works. Three novels, four collections of short stories and three non-fiction works were published posthumously. Many of these are considered classics of American literature. Hemingway was raised in Oak Park, Illinois. After high school he reported for a few months for The Kansas City Star, before leaving for the Italian front to enlist with the World War I ambulance drivers. In 1918, he was seriously wounded and returned home. His wartime experiences formed the basis for his novel A Farewell to Arms. In 1922, he married Hadley Richardson, the first of his four wives. The couple moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent, and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s "Lost Generation" expatriate community. The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway's first novel, was published in 1926.

Hemingway was raised in Oak Park, Illinois. After high school he reported for a few months for The Kansas City Star, before leaving for the Italian front to enlist with the World War I ambulance drivers. In 1918, he was seriously wounded and returned home. His wartime experiences formed the basis for his novel A Farewell to Arms. In 1922, he married Hadley Richardson, the first of his four wives. The couple moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent, and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s "Lost Generation" expatriate community. The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway's first novel, was published in 1926.

Mark Twain

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He is most noted for his novels, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called "the Great American Novel."

Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. He apprenticed with a printer. He also worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion's newspaper. After toiling as a printer in various cities, he became a master riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River, before heading west to join Orion. He was a failure at gold mining, so he next turned to journalism. While a reporter, he wrote a humorous story, "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County", which became very popular and brought nationwide attention. His travelogues were also well received. Twain had found his calling.

He achieved great success as a writer and public speaker. His wit and satire earned praise from critics and peers, and he was a friend to presidents, artists, industrialists, and European royalty.

John Griffith 'Jack' London

John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone. He is best remembered as the author of Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel, The Iron Heel and his non-fiction exposé, The People of the Abyss.


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  27:                                  class="left-side-image" /><span>
  28:                                      <p>
  29:                                          Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American author and
  30:                                          journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century
  31:                                          fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations.
  32:                                          Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and
  33:                                          won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short
  34:                                          story collections and two non-fiction works. Three novels, four collections of short
  35:                                          stories and three non-fiction works were published posthumously. Many of these are
  36:                                          considered classics of American literature. Hemingway was raised in Oak Park, Illinois.
  37:                                          After high school he reported for a few months for The Kansas City Star, before
  38:                                          leaving for the Italian front to enlist with the World War I ambulance drivers.
  39:                                          In 1918, he was seriously wounded and returned home. His wartime experiences formed
  40:                                          the basis for his novel A Farewell to Arms. In 1922, he married Hadley Richardson,
  41:                                          the first of his four wives. The couple moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign
  42:                                          correspondent, and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists
  43:                                          of the 1920s "Lost Generation" expatriate community. The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway's
  44:                                          first novel, was published in 1926.</p>
  45:                                      <p>
  46:                                          Hemingway was raised in Oak Park, Illinois. After high school he reported for a
  47:                                          few months for The Kansas City Star, before leaving for the Italian front to enlist
  48:                                          with the World War I ambulance drivers. In 1918, he was seriously wounded and returned
  49:                                          home. His wartime experiences formed the basis for his novel A Farewell to Arms.
  50:                                          In 1922, he married Hadley Richardson, the first of his four wives. The couple moved
  51:                                          to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent, and fell under the influence
  52:                                          of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s "Lost Generation" expatriate community.
  53:                                          The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway's first novel, was published in 1926.
  54:                                      </p>
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  59:                  <atom:TabItem Header="Mark Twain">
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  62:                              <img src="../images/authors/mark_twain.jpg" title="Mark Twain" alt="Mark Twain" class="right-side-image" /><span>
  63:                                  <p>
  64:                                      Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his
  65:                                      pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He is most noted for his
  66:                                      novels, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry
  67:                                      Finn (1885), the latter often called "the Great American Novel."</p>
  68:                                  <p>
  69:                                      Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry
  70:                                      Finn and Tom Sawyer. He apprenticed with a printer. He also worked as a typesetter
  71:                                      and contributed articles to his older brother Orion's newspaper. After toiling as
  72:                                      a printer in various cities, he became a master riverboat pilot on the Mississippi
  73:                                      River, before heading west to join Orion. He was a failure at gold mining, so he
  74:                                      next turned to journalism. While a reporter, he wrote a humorous story, "The Celebrated
  75:                                      Jumping Frog of Calaveras County", which became very popular and brought nationwide
  76:                                      attention. His travelogues were also well received. Twain had found his calling.
  77:                                  </p>
  78:                                  <p>
  79:                                      He achieved great success as a writer and public speaker. His wit and satire earned
  80:                                      praise from critics and peers, and he was a friend to presidents, artists, industrialists,
  81:                                      and European royalty.</p>
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  90:                                  class="left-side-image" />
  91:                              <span>
  92:                                  <p>
  93:                                      John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November
  94:                                      22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer
  95:                                      in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first
  96:                                      fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction
  97:                                      alone. He is best remembered as the author of Call of the Wild and White Fang, both
  98:                                      set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An
  99:                                      Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in
 100:                                      such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco
 101:                                      Bay area in The Sea Wolf.
 102:                                  </p>
 103:                                  <p>
 104:                                      London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers
 105:                                      and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian
 106:                                      novel, The Iron Heel and his non-fiction exposé, The People of the Abyss.</p>
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   1:  using System;
   2:  using System.Collections.Generic;
   3:  using System.Linq;
   4:  using System.Web;
   5:  using System.Web.UI;
   6:  using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
   7:   
   8:  namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AspNet
   9:  {
  10:      public partial class Tabs : System.Web.UI.Page
  11:      {
  12:          protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
  13:          {
  14:   
  15:          }
  16:      }
  17:  }
   1:  Imports System
   2:  Imports System.Collections.Generic
   3:  Imports System.Linq
   4:  Imports System.Web
   5:  Imports System.Web.UI
   6:  Imports System.Web.UI.WebControls
   7:  Namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AspNet
   8:      Public Partial Class Tabs
   9:          Inherits System.Web.UI.Page
  10:          Protected Sub Page_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs)
  11:          End Sub
  12:      End Class
  13:  End Namespace