Action

Sir Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton PRS MP (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727 [NS: 4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727]) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, alchemist, and theologian, who has been "considered by many to be the greatest and most influential scientist who ever lived." His monograph Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, published in 1687, lays the foundations for most of classical mechanics. In this work, Newton described universal gravitation and the three laws of motion, which dominated the scientific view of the physical universe for the next three centuries. Newton showed that the motions of objects on Earth and of celestial bodies are governed by the same set of natural laws, by demonstrating the consistency between Kepler's laws of planetary motion and his theory of gravitation, thus removing the last doubts about heliocentrism and advancing the Scientific Revolution.

The Principia is generally considered to be one of the most important scientific books ever written, due, independently, to the specific physical laws the work successfully described, and for the style of the work, which assisted in setting standards for scientific publication down to the present time. Newton built the first practical reflecting telescope and developed a theory of colour based on the observation that a prism decomposes white light into the many colours that form the visible spectrum. He also formulated an empirical law of cooling and studied the speed of sound. In mathematics, Newton shares the credit with Gottfried Leibniz for the development of differential and integral calculus. He also demonstrated the generalised binomial theorem, developed Newton's method for approximating the roots of a function, and contributed to the study of power series. Newton's work on infinite series was inspired by Simon Stevin's decimals. Newton, although an unorthodox Christian, was deeply religious, and wrote more on Biblical hermeneutics and occult studies than on science and mathematics. Newton secretly rejected Trinitarianism, and feared being accused of refusing holy orders.

Jacques-Yves Cousteau Jacques-Yves Cousteau (commonly known in English as Jacques Cousteau; 11 June 1910 – 25 June 1997) was a French naval officer, explorer, conservationist, filmmaker, innovator, scientist, photographer, author and researcher who studied the sea and all forms of life in water. He co-developed the Aqua-Lung, pioneered marine conservation and was a member of the Académie française. He was also known as "le Commandant Cousteau" or "Captain Cousteau".
Stephen William Hawking

Stephen William Hawking, CH, CBE, FRS, FRSA (born 8 January 1942) is a British theoretical physicist, and author. His key scientific works to date have included providing, with Roger Penrose, theorems regarding the occurrence of gravitational singularities in the framework of general relativity, and the theoretical prediction that black holes should emit radiation, which is today known as Hawking radiation (or sometimes as Bekenstein–Hawking radiation).

He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and in 2009 was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. Hawking was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009. Subsequently, he became research director at the university's Centre for Theoretical Cosmology.

Hawking has a motor neurone disease related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a condition that has progressed over the years. He is now almost completely paralysed and communicates through a speech generating device. He has been married twice and has three children. Hawking has achieved success with works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general; these include A Brief History of Time, which stayed on the British Sunday Times best-sellers list for a record-breaking 237 weeks.

Plato

Plato (Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn, "broad"; 424/423 BC – 348/347 BC) was a Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science. In the words of A. N. Whitehead:

The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato. I do not mean the systematic scheme of thought which scholars have doubtfully extracted from his writings. I allude to the wealth of general ideas scattered through them.

Plato's sophistication as a writer is evident in his Socratic dialogues; thirty-six dialogues and thirteen letters have been ascribed to him. Plato's writings have been published in several fashions; this has led to several conventions regarding the naming and referencing of Plato's texts. Plato's dialogues have been used to teach a range of subjects, including philosophy, logic, ethics, rhetoric, and mathematics.



Info
   1:  <%@ Page Language="C#" Title="AtomicTabs -- Remove" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="Remove.aspx.cs" Inherits="Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicTabs.Remove" %>
   2:   
   3:  <%@ Register Src="../Source.ascx" TagName="Source" TagPrefix="sample" %>
   4:  <%@ Register Assembly="Atom.Web" Namespace="Atom.Web.UI.WebControls" TagPrefix="atom" %>
   5:  <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
   6:  <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
   7:  <head id="Header1" runat="server">
   8:      <link rel="Shortcut Icon" type="image/ico" href="../images/icon.png" />
   9:      <!-- The jQuery UI theme that will be used by the components. -->
  10:      <link href="../themes/base/jquery-ui.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
  11:      <!-- jQuery runtime minified -->
  12:      <script src="../Scripts/jquery-1.9.1.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  13:      <!-- jQuery UI runtime minified, client-side javascript of the components.-->
  14:      <script src="../Scripts/jquery-ui-1.10.3.custom.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  15:      <!-- This style reference is needed only for the current example. -->
  16:      <link href="../css/example.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
  17:  </head>
  18:  <body>
  19:      <form id="form1" runat="server">
  20:      <fieldset>
  21:          <legend>Action </legend>
  22:          <asp:CheckBox ID="AllowRemove" Text="Allow remove" runat="server" Checked="true"
  23:              AutoPostBack="true" OnCheckedChanged="AllowRemove_CheckedChanged" />
  24:      </fieldset>
  25:      <br />
  26:      <div>
  27:          <atom:AtomicTabs ID="AtomicTabs1" runat="server" AllowRemove="true">
  28:              <Tabs>
  29:                  <atom:TabItem runat="server" Enable="True" Header="Sir Isaac Newton">
  30:                      <Template>
  31:                          <div class="tab-example-content">
  32:                              <img src="../images/scientists/isaac_newton.jpg" title="Sir Isaac Newton" alt="Sir Isaac Newton"
  33:                                  class="left-side-image" />
  34:                              <span>
  35:                                  <p>
  36:                                      Sir Isaac Newton PRS MP (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727 [NS: 4 January 1643 –
  37:                                      31 March 1727]) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher,
  38:                                      alchemist, and theologian, who has been "considered by many to be the greatest and
  39:                                      most influential scientist who ever lived." His monograph Philosophiæ Naturalis
  40:                                      Principia Mathematica, published in 1687, lays the foundations for most of classical
  41:                                      mechanics. In this work, Newton described universal gravitation and the three laws
  42:                                      of motion, which dominated the scientific view of the physical universe for the
  43:                                      next three centuries. Newton showed that the motions of objects on Earth and of
  44:                                      celestial bodies are governed by the same set of natural laws, by demonstrating
  45:                                      the consistency between Kepler's laws of planetary motion and his theory of gravitation,
  46:                                      thus removing the last doubts about heliocentrism and advancing the Scientific Revolution.
  47:                                  </p>
  48:                                  <p>
  49:                                      The Principia is generally considered to be one of the most important scientific
  50:                                      books ever written, due, independently, to the specific physical laws the work successfully
  51:                                      described, and for the style of the work, which assisted in setting standards for
  52:                                      scientific publication down to the present time. Newton built the first practical
  53:                                      reflecting telescope and developed a theory of colour based on the observation that
  54:                                      a prism decomposes white light into the many colours that form the visible spectrum.
  55:                                      He also formulated an empirical law of cooling and studied the speed of sound. In
  56:                                      mathematics, Newton shares the credit with Gottfried Leibniz for the development
  57:                                      of differential and integral calculus. He also demonstrated the generalised binomial
  58:                                      theorem, developed Newton's method for approximating the roots of a function, and
  59:                                      contributed to the study of power series. Newton's work on infinite series was inspired
  60:                                      by Simon Stevin's decimals. Newton, although an unorthodox Christian, was deeply
  61:                                      religious, and wrote more on Biblical hermeneutics and occult studies than on science
  62:                                      and mathematics. Newton secretly rejected Trinitarianism, and feared being accused
  63:                                      of refusing holy orders.
  64:                                  </p>
  65:                              </span>
  66:                          </div>
  67:                      </Template>
  68:                  </atom:TabItem>
  69:                  <atom:TabItem runat="server" Enable="True" Header="Jacques-Yves Cousteau">
  70:                      <Template>
  71:                          <div class="tab-example-content">
  72:                              <img src="../images/scientists/jacques_cousteau.jpg" title="Jacques-Yves Cousteau"
  73:                                  alt="Jacques-Yves Cousteau" class="right-side-image" />
  74:                              <span>Jacques-Yves Cousteau (commonly known in English as Jacques Cousteau; 11 June
  75:                                  1910 – 25 June 1997) was a French naval officer, explorer, conservationist, filmmaker,
  76:                                  innovator, scientist, photographer, author and researcher who studied the sea and
  77:                                  all forms of life in water. He co-developed the Aqua-Lung, pioneered marine conservation
  78:                                  and was a member of the Académie française. He was also known as "le Commandant
  79:                                  Cousteau" or "Captain Cousteau". </span>
  80:                          </div>
  81:                      </Template>
  82:                  </atom:TabItem>
  83:                  <atom:TabItem runat="server" Enable="True" Header="Stephen William Hawking">
  84:                      <Template>
  85:                          <div class="tab-example-content">
  86:                              <img src="../images/scientists/stephen_hawking.jpg" title="Stephen William Hawking"
  87:                                  alt="Stephen William Hawking" class="left-side-image" />
  88:                              <span>
  89:                                  <p>
  90:                                      Stephen William Hawking, CH, CBE, FRS, FRSA (born 8 January 1942) is a British theoretical
  91:                                      physicist, and author. His key scientific works to date have included providing,
  92:                                      with Roger Penrose, theorems regarding the occurrence of gravitational singularities
  93:                                      in the framework of general relativity, and the theoretical prediction that black
  94:                                      holes should emit radiation, which is today known as Hawking radiation (or sometimes
  95:                                      as Bekenstein–Hawking radiation).
  96:                                  </p>
  97:                                  <p>
  98:                                      He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a lifetime member of the
  99:                                      Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and in 2009 was awarded the Presidential Medal of
 100:                                      Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. Hawking was the Lucasian
 101:                                      Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009. Subsequently,
 102:                                      he became research director at the university's Centre for Theoretical Cosmology.
 103:                                  </p>
 104:                                  <p>
 105:                                      Hawking has a motor neurone disease related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a
 106:                                      condition that has progressed over the years. He is now almost completely paralysed
 107:                                      and communicates through a speech generating device. He has been married twice and
 108:                                      has three children. Hawking has achieved success with works of popular science in
 109:                                      which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general; these include A Brief
 110:                                      History of Time, which stayed on the British Sunday Times best-sellers list for
 111:                                      a record-breaking 237 weeks.
 112:                                  </p>
 113:                              </span>
 114:                          </div>
 115:                      </Template>
 116:                  </atom:TabItem>
 117:                  <atom:TabItem runat="server" Enable="True" Header="Plato">
 118:                      <Template>
 119:                          <div class="tab-example-content">
 120:                              <img src="../images/scientists/plato_bustsm.jpg" title="Plato" alt="Plato" class="right-side-image" />
 121:                              <span>
 122:                                  <p>
 123:                                      Plato (Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn, "broad"; 424/423 BC – 348/347 BC) was a Classical
 124:                                      Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues,
 125:                                      and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in
 126:                                      the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle,
 127:                                      Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science. In the words
 128:                                      of A. N. Whitehead:
 129:                                  </p>
 130:                                  <p>
 131:                                      The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that
 132:                                      it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato. I do not mean the systematic scheme
 133:                                      of thought which scholars have doubtfully extracted from his writings. I allude
 134:                                      to the wealth of general ideas scattered through them.
 135:                                  </p>
 136:                                  <p>
 137:                                      Plato's sophistication as a writer is evident in his Socratic dialogues; thirty-six
 138:                                      dialogues and thirteen letters have been ascribed to him. Plato's writings have
 139:                                      been published in several fashions; this has led to several conventions regarding
 140:                                      the naming and referencing of Plato's texts. Plato's dialogues have been used to
 141:                                      teach a range of subjects, including philosophy, logic, ethics, rhetoric, and mathematics.
 142:                                  </p>
 143:                              </span>
 144:                          </div>
 145:                      </Template>
 146:                  </atom:TabItem>
 147:              </Tabs>
 148:          </atom:AtomicTabs>
 149:      </div>
 150:      <br />
 151:      <sample:Source ID="Code" runat="server" />
 152:      </form>
 153:  </body>
 154:  </html>
   1:  using System;
   2:  using System.Collections.Generic;
   3:  using System.Linq;
   4:  using System.Web;
   5:  using System.Web.UI;
   6:  using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
   7:   
   8:  namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicTabs
   9:  {
  10:      public partial class Remove : System.Web.UI.Page
  11:      {
  12:          protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
  13:          {
  14:   
  15:          }
  16:   
  17:          protected void AllowRemove_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
  18:          {
  19:              AtomicTabs1.AllowRemove = AllowRemove.Checked;
  20:          }
  21:      }
  22:  }
   1:  Imports System
   2:  Imports System.Collections.Generic
   3:  Imports System.Linq
   4:  Imports System.Web
   5:  Imports System.Web.UI
   6:  Imports System.Web.UI.WebControls
   7:  Namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicTabs
   8:      Public Partial Class Remove
   9:          Inherits System.Web.UI.Page
  10:          Protected Sub Page_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs)
  11:          End Sub
  12:          Protected Sub AllowRemove_CheckedChanged(sender As Object, e As EventArgs)
  13:              AtomicTabs1.AllowRemove = AllowRemove.Checked
  14:          End Sub
  15:      End Class
  16:  End Namespace