Action
Selection Type 

Goodfellas

Goodfellas

Goodfellas (stylized as GoodFellas) is a 1990 American crime film directed by Martin Scorsese. It is a film adaptation of the 1986 non-fiction book Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi, who co-wrote the screenplay with Scorsese. The film follows the rise and fall of Lucchese crime family associates Henry Hill and his friends over a period from 1955 to 1980.

Scorsese originally intended to direct Goodfellas before The Last Temptation of Christ, but when funds materialized to make Last Temptation, he postponed what was then known as Wise Guy. The title of Pileggi's book had already been used for a TV series and for Brian De Palma's 1986 comedy Wise Guys, so Pileggi and Scorsese changed the name of their film to Goodfellas. To prepare for their roles in the film, Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, and Ray Liotta often spoke with Pileggi, who shared research material left over from writing the book. According to Pesci, improvisation and ad-libbing came out of rehearsals where Scorsese gave the actors freedom to do whatever they wanted. The director made transcripts of these sessions, took the lines he liked best, and put them into a revised script the cast worked from during principal photography.

Goodfellas performed well at the box office, grossing $46.8 million domestically, well above its $25 million budget. It also received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics. The film was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director, and won one for Pesci in the Best Actor in a Supporting Role category. Scorsese's film won five awards from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, including Best Film, and Best Director. The film was named Best Film of the year by various film critics groups. Goodfellas is often considered one of the greatest films ever, both in the crime genre and in general, and was deemed "culturally significant" and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the United States Library of Congress. Scorsese followed this film up with two more films about organized crime: 1995's Casino and 2006's The Departed.

Rear Window

Rear Window

Rear Window is a 1954 American suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, written by John Michael Hayes and based on Cornell Woolrich's 1942 short story "It Had to Be Murder". Originally released by Paramount Pictures, the film stars James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey, and Thelma Ritter.

The film is considered by many filmgoers, critics and scholars to be one of Hitchcock's best. The film received four Academy Award nominations and was ranked #42 on AFI's 100 Years…100 Movies list and #48 on the 10th-anniversary edition. In 1997, Rear Window was added to the United States National Film Registry.

Star Wars Episode V

Star Wars Episode V

Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (also known as The Empire Strikes Back) is a 1980 American epic space opera film directed by Irvin Kershner and written by Leigh Brackett and Lawrence Kasdan, with George Lucas writing the film's story and serving as executive producer. Of the six main Star Wars films, it was the second to be released and the fifth in terms of internal chronology.

The film is set three years after the original Star Wars. The Galactic Empire, under the leadership of the villainous Darth Vader, is in pursuit of Luke Skywalker and the rest of the Rebel Alliance. While Vader chases a small band of Luke's friends—Han Solo, Princess Leia Organa, and others—across the galaxy, Luke studies the Force under Jedi Master Yoda. But when Vader captures Luke's friends, Luke must decide whether to complete his training and become a full Jedi Knight or to confront Vader and save his comrades.

Following a difficult production, The Empire Strikes Back was released on May 21, 1980, and initially received mixed reviews from critics, although it has since grown in esteem, becoming one of the most popular chapters in the Star Wars saga and one of the most highly-rated films in history. It earned more than $538 million worldwide over the original run and several re-releases, making it the highest grossing film of 1980. When adjusted for inflation, it is the 12th highest grossing film in the USA and Canada as of 2010.

The Silence of the Lambs

The Silence of the Lambs

The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 American thriller film that blends elements of the crime and horror genres. It was directed by Jonathan Demme and stars Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Ted Levine, and Scott Glenn. It is based on the 1988 novel of the same name by Thomas Harris, his second to feature Hannibal Lecter, a brilliant psychiatrist and cannibalistic serial killer.

In the film, Clarice Starling, a young FBI trainee, seeks the advice of the imprisoned Dr. Lecter to apprehend another serial killer, known only as "Buffalo Bill".

The Silence of the Lambs was released on February 14, 1991, and grossed over $272 million. The film was the third film to win Oscars in all the top five categories: Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay. It is also the first winner of Best Picture widely considered to be a horror film, and only the second such film to be nominated in the category (after The Exorcist in 1973). The film is considered "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant by the US Library of Congress and was selected to be preserved in the National Film Registry in 2011.

Schindler's List

Star Wars Episode V

Schindler's List is a 1993 film about Oskar Schindler, a German businessman who saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees during the Holocaust by employing them in his factories. The film was directed by Steven Spielberg, and based on the novel Schindler's Ark by Australian novelist Thomas Keneally. It stars Liam Neeson as Schindler, Ralph Fiennes as Schutzstaffel (SS)-officer Amon Göth, and Ben Kingsley as Schindler's Jewish accountant Itzhak Stern.

The film was a box office success and recipient of seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Original Score, as well as numerous other awards (7 BAFTAs, 3 Golden Globes). In 2007, the American Film Institute ranked the film 8th on its list of the 100 best American films of all time (up one position from its 9th place listing on the 1998 list).



Click headers to expand/collapse content that is broken into logical sections, much like tabs. Optionally, toggle sections open/closed on mouseover.
   1:  <%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" Title="AtomicAccordion -- Selection" CodeBehind="Selection.aspx.cs" Inherits="Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicAccordion.Selection" %>
   2:   
   3:  <%@ Register Assembly="Atom.Web" Namespace="Atom.Web.UI.WebControls" TagPrefix="atom" %>
   4:  <%@ Register Src="../Source.ascx" TagName="Source" TagPrefix="sample" %>
   5:  <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
   6:  <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
   7:  <head id="Header1" runat="server">
   8:      <link rel="Shortcut Icon" type="image/ico" href="../images/icon.png" /> 
   9:      <!-- The jQuery UI theme that will be used by the components. -->
  10:      <link href="../themes/base/jquery-ui.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
  11:      <!-- jQuery runtime minified -->
  12:      <script src="../Scripts/jquery-1.9.1.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  13:      <!-- jQuery UI runtime minified, client-side javascript of the components.-->
  14:      <script src="../Scripts/jquery-ui-1.10.3.custom.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  15:      <!-- This style reference is needed only for the current example. -->
  16:      <link href="../css/example.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
  17:  </head>
  18:  <body>
  19:      <form id="form1" runat="server">
  20:      <fieldset>
  21:          <legend>Action</legend>
  22:          <div id="control">
  23:              Selection Type&nbsp;
  24:              <asp:DropDownList runat="server" ID="SelectionType" AutoPostBack="true" OnSelectedIndexChanged="SelectionType_SelectedIndexChanged">
  25:                  <asp:ListItem Text="Click" Value="Click"> </asp:ListItem>
  26:                  <asp:ListItem Text="Hover" Value="Hover"></asp:ListItem>
  27:              </asp:DropDownList>
  28:          </div>
  29:      </fieldset>
  30:      <br />
  31:      <div>
  32:          <atom:AtomicAccordion ID="AtomicAccordion1" runat="server" SelectionType="Click">
  33:              <Items>
  34:                  <atom:AccordionItem Header="Goodfellas">
  35:                      <Template>
  36:                          <img src="../images/movies/goodfellas.jpg" alt="Goodfellas" title="Goodfellas" class="right-side-image" />
  37:                          <span>
  38:                              <p>
  39:                                  Goodfellas (stylized as GoodFellas) is a 1990 American crime film directed by Martin
  40:                                  Scorsese. It is a film adaptation of the 1986 non-fiction book Wiseguy by Nicholas
  41:                                  Pileggi, who co-wrote the screenplay with Scorsese. The film follows the rise and
  42:                                  fall of Lucchese crime family associates Henry Hill and his friends over a period
  43:                                  from 1955 to 1980.
  44:                              </p>
  45:                              <p>
  46:                                  Scorsese originally intended to direct Goodfellas before The Last Temptation of
  47:                                  Christ, but when funds materialized to make Last Temptation, he postponed what was
  48:                                  then known as Wise Guy. The title of Pileggi's book had already been used for a
  49:                                  TV series and for Brian De Palma's 1986 comedy Wise Guys, so Pileggi and Scorsese
  50:                                  changed the name of their film to Goodfellas. To prepare for their roles in the
  51:                                  film, Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, and Ray Liotta often spoke with Pileggi, who shared
  52:                                  research material left over from writing the book. According to Pesci, improvisation
  53:                                  and ad-libbing came out of rehearsals where Scorsese gave the actors freedom to
  54:                                  do whatever they wanted. The director made transcripts of these sessions, took the
  55:                                  lines he liked best, and put them into a revised script the cast worked from during
  56:                                  principal photography.
  57:                              </p>
  58:                              <p>
  59:                                  Goodfellas performed well at the box office, grossing $46.8 million domestically,
  60:                                  well above its $25 million budget. It also received overwhelmingly positive reviews
  61:                                  from critics. The film was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture
  62:                                  and Best Director, and won one for Pesci in the Best Actor in a Supporting Role
  63:                                  category. Scorsese's film won five awards from the British Academy of Film and Television
  64:                                  Arts, including Best Film, and Best Director. The film was named Best Film of the
  65:                                  year by various film critics groups. Goodfellas is often considered one of the greatest
  66:                                  films ever, both in the crime genre and in general, and was deemed "culturally significant"
  67:                                  and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the United States
  68:                                  Library of Congress. Scorsese followed this film up with two more films about organized
  69:                                  crime: 1995's Casino and 2006's The Departed.
  70:                              </p>
  71:                          </span>
  72:                      </Template>
  73:                  </atom:AccordionItem>
  74:                  <atom:AccordionItem Header="Rear Window">
  75:                      <Template>
  76:                          <img src="../images/movies/rear_window.jpg" alt="Rear Window" title="Rear Window"
  77:                              class="left-side-image" />
  78:                          <span>
  79:                              <p>
  80:                                  Rear Window is a 1954 American suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, written
  81:                                  by John Michael Hayes and based on Cornell Woolrich's 1942 short story "It Had to
  82:                                  Be Murder". Originally released by Paramount Pictures, the film stars James Stewart,
  83:                                  Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey, and Thelma Ritter.
  84:                              </p>
  85:                              <p>
  86:                                  The film is considered by many filmgoers, critics and scholars to be one of Hitchcock's
  87:                                  best. The film received four Academy Award nominations and was ranked #42 on AFI's
  88:                                  100 Years…100 Movies list and #48 on the 10th-anniversary edition. In 1997, Rear
  89:                                  Window was added to the United States National Film Registry.</p>
  90:                          </span>
  91:                      </Template>
  92:                  </atom:AccordionItem>
  93:                  <atom:AccordionItem Header="Star Wars Episode V">
  94:                      <Template>
  95:                          <img src="../images/movies/sw_empire_strikes_back.jpg" alt="Star Wars Episode V"
  96:                              title="Star Wars Episode V" class="right-side-image" />
  97:                          <span>
  98:                              <p>
  99:                                  Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (also known as The Empire Strikes Back)
 100:                                  is a 1980 American epic space opera film directed by Irvin Kershner and written
 101:                                  by Leigh Brackett and Lawrence Kasdan, with George Lucas writing the film's story
 102:                                  and serving as executive producer. Of the six main Star Wars films, it was the second
 103:                                  to be released and the fifth in terms of internal chronology.</p>
 104:                              <p>
 105:                                  The film is set three years after the original Star Wars. The Galactic Empire, under
 106:                                  the leadership of the villainous Darth Vader, is in pursuit of Luke Skywalker and
 107:                                  the rest of the Rebel Alliance. While Vader chases a small band of Luke's friends—Han
 108:                                  Solo, Princess Leia Organa, and others—across the galaxy, Luke studies the Force
 109:                                  under Jedi Master Yoda. But when Vader captures Luke's friends, Luke must decide
 110:                                  whether to complete his training and become a full Jedi Knight or to confront Vader
 111:                                  and save his comrades.</p>
 112:                              <p>
 113:                                  Following a difficult production, The Empire Strikes Back was released on May 21,
 114:                                  1980, and initially received mixed reviews from critics, although it has since grown
 115:                                  in esteem, becoming one of the most popular chapters in the Star Wars saga and one
 116:                                  of the most highly-rated films in history. It earned more than $538 million worldwide
 117:                                  over the original run and several re-releases, making it the highest grossing film
 118:                                  of 1980. When adjusted for inflation, it is the 12th highest grossing film in the
 119:                                  USA and Canada as of 2010.</p>
 120:                          </span>
 121:                      </Template>
 122:                  </atom:AccordionItem>
 123:                  <atom:AccordionItem Header="The Silence of the Lambs">
 124:                      <Template>
 125:                          <img src="../images/movies/the_silence_of_the_lambs.jpg" alt="The Silence of the Lambs"
 126:                              title="The Silence of the Lambs" class="left-side-image" />
 127:                          <span>
 128:                              <p>
 129:                                  The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 American thriller film that blends elements of
 130:                                  the crime and horror genres. It was directed by Jonathan Demme and stars Jodie Foster,
 131:                                  Anthony Hopkins, Ted Levine, and Scott Glenn. It is based on the 1988 novel of the
 132:                                  same name by Thomas Harris, his second to feature Hannibal Lecter, a brilliant psychiatrist
 133:                                  and cannibalistic serial killer.
 134:                              </p>
 135:                              <p>
 136:                                  In the film, Clarice Starling, a young FBI trainee, seeks the advice of the imprisoned
 137:                                  Dr. Lecter to apprehend another serial killer, known only as "Buffalo Bill".
 138:                              </p>
 139:                              <p>
 140:                                  The Silence of the Lambs was released on February 14, 1991, and grossed over $272
 141:                                  million. The film was the third film to win Oscars in all the top five categories:
 142:                                  Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay.
 143:                                  It is also the first winner of Best Picture widely considered to be a horror film,
 144:                                  and only the second such film to be nominated in the category (after The Exorcist
 145:                                  in 1973). The film is considered "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant
 146:                                  by the US Library of Congress and was selected to be preserved in the National Film
 147:                                  Registry in 2011.
 148:                              </p>
 149:                          </span>
 150:                      </Template>
 151:                  </atom:AccordionItem>
 152:                  <atom:AccordionItem Header="Schindler's List">
 153:                      <Template>
 154:                          <img src="../images/movies/schindlers_list.jpg" alt="Star Wars Episode V" title="Star Wars Episode V"
 155:                              class="right-side-image" />
 156:                          <span>
 157:                              <p>
 158:                                  Schindler's List is a 1993 film about Oskar Schindler, a German businessman who
 159:                                  saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees during the
 160:                                  Holocaust by employing them in his factories. The film was directed by Steven Spielberg,
 161:                                  and based on the novel Schindler's Ark by Australian novelist Thomas Keneally. It
 162:                                  stars Liam Neeson as Schindler, Ralph Fiennes as Schutzstaffel (SS)-officer Amon
 163:                                  Göth, and Ben Kingsley as Schindler's Jewish accountant Itzhak Stern.
 164:                              </p>
 165:                              <p>
 166:                                  The film was a box office success and recipient of seven Academy Awards, including
 167:                                  Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Original Score, as well as numerous other
 168:                                  awards (7 BAFTAs, 3 Golden Globes). In 2007, the American Film Institute ranked
 169:                                  the film 8th on its list of the 100 best American films of all time (up one position
 170:                                  from its 9th place listing on the 1998 list).
 171:                              </p>
 172:                          </span>
 173:                      </Template>
 174:                  </atom:AccordionItem>
 175:              </Items>
 176:          </atom:AtomicAccordion>
 177:      </div>
 178:      <br />
 179:      <sample:Source ID="Code" runat="server" />
 180:      </form>
 181:  </body>
 182:  </html>
   1:  using System;
   2:  using System.Collections.Generic;
   3:  using System.Linq;
   4:  using System.Web;
   5:  using System.Web.UI;
   6:  using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
   7:   
   8:  namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicAccordion
   9:  {
  10:      public partial class Selection : System.Web.UI.Page
  11:      {
  12:          protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
  13:          {
  14:          }
  15:   
  16:          protected void SelectionType_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
  17:          {
  18:              if (((DropDownList)sender).SelectedValue == "Click")
  19:              {
  20:                  AtomicAccordion1.SelectionType = Web.UI.WebControls. SelectionType.Click;
  21:              }
  22:              else if (((DropDownList)sender).SelectedValue == "Hover")
  23:              {
  24:                  AtomicAccordion1.SelectionType = Web.UI.WebControls.SelectionType.Hover;
  25:              }
  26:          }
  27:      }
  28:  }
   1:  Imports System
   2:  Imports System.Collections.Generic
   3:  Imports System.Linq
   4:  Imports System.Web
   5:  Imports System.Web.UI
   6:  Imports System.Web.UI.WebControls
   7:  Namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicAccordion
   8:      Public Partial Class Selection
   9:          Inherits System.Web.UI.Page
  10:          Protected Sub Page_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs)
  11:          End Sub
  12:          Protected Sub SelectionType_SelectedIndexChanged(sender As Object, e As EventArgs)
  13:              If (DirectCast(sender, DropDownList)).SelectedValue = "Click" Then
  14:                  AtomicAccordion1.SelectionType = Web.UI.WebControls.SelectionType.Click
  15:              ElseIf (DirectCast(sender, DropDownList)).SelectedValue = "Hover" Then
  16:                  AtomicAccordion1.SelectionType = Web.UI.WebControls.SelectionType.Hover
  17:              End If
  18:          End Sub
  19:      End Class
  20:  End Namespace