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Fight Club

Fight Club

Fight Club is a 1999 American film based on the 1996 novel of the same name by Chuck Palahniuk. The film was directed by David Fincher and stars Edward Norton, Brad Pitt, and Helena Bonham Carter. Norton plays the unnamed protagonist, an "everyman" who is discontented with his white-collar job. He forms a "fight club" with soap maker Tyler Durden, played by Pitt, and becomes embroiled in a relationship with him and a dissolute woman, Marla Singer, played by Bonham Carter.

Palahniuk's novel was optioned by 20th Century Fox producer Laura Ziskin, who hired Jim Uhls to write the film adaptation. Fincher was one of four directors the producers considered and hired him because of his enthusiasm for the film. Fincher developed the script with Uhls and sought screenwriting advice from the cast and others in the film industry. The director and the cast compared the film to Rebel Without a Cause (1955) and The Graduate (1967). Fincher intended Fight Club's violence to serve as a metaphor for the conflict between a generation of young people and the value system of advertising. The director copied the homoerotic overtones from Palahniuk's novel to make audiences uncomfortable and keep them from anticipating the twist ending.

Studio executives did not like the film and they restructured Fincher's intended marketing campaign to try to reduce anticipated losses. Fight Club failed to meet the studio's expectations at the box office and received polarized reactions from critics. It was cited as one of the most controversial and talked-about films of 1999. However, the film later found commercial success with its DVD release, which established Fight Club as a cult film. Critical reception of Fight Club has since become more positive.

Casablanca

Casablanca

Casablanca is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz, starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and Paul Henreid, and featuring Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre and Dooley Wilson. Set during World War II, it focuses on a man torn between, in the words of one character, love and virtue. He must choose between his love for a woman and helping her and her Czech Resistance leader husband escape from the Vichy-controlled Moroccan city of Casablanca to continue his fight against the Nazis.

Although it was an A-list film, with established stars and first-rate writers—Julius J. Epstein, Philip G. Epstein and Howard Koch received credit for the screenplay—no one involved with its production expected Casablanca to be anything out of the ordinary; it was just one of hundreds of pictures produced by Hollywood every year. The film was a solid, if unspectacular, success in its initial run, rushed into release to take advantage of the publicity from the Allied invasion of North Africa a few weeks earlier. Despite a changing assortment of screenwriters frantically adapting an unstaged play and barely keeping ahead of production, and Bogart attempting his first romantic lead role, Casablanca won three Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Its characters, dialogue, and music have become iconic, and the film has grown in popularity to the point that it now consistently ranks near the top of lists of the greatest films of all time.

The Matrix

The Matrix

The Matrix is a 1999 American science fiction action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski. The film stars Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano, and Hugo Weaving, and was first released in the United States on March 31, 1999. The success of the film led to the release of two feature film sequels, and the Matrix franchise was further expanded through the production of comic books, video games, and animated short films.

The film depicts a future in which reality as perceived by most humans is actually a simulated reality created by sentient machines to pacify and subdue the human population, while their bodies' heat and electrical activity are used as an energy source. Upon learning this, computer programmer "Neo" is drawn into a rebellion against the machines, involving other people who have been freed from the "dream world" and into reality.

The film contains many references to the cyberpunk and hacker subcultures; philosophical and religious ideas such as Rene Descartes' evil genius, the Allegory of the Cave, the brain in a vat thought experiment; and homages to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Hong Kong action cinema, spaghetti westerns, dystopian fiction, and Japanese animation.



Info
   1:  <%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" Title="AtomicAccordion -- Resizable" CodeBehind="Resizable.aspx.cs" Inherits="Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicAccordion.Resizable" %>
   2:   
   3:  <%@ Register Assembly="Atom.Web" Namespace="Atom.Web.UI.WebControls" TagPrefix="atom" %>
   4:  <%@ Register Src="../Source.ascx" TagName="Source" TagPrefix="sample" %>
   5:  <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
   6:  <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
   7:  <head id="Header1" runat="server">
   8:      <link rel="Shortcut Icon" type="image/ico" href="../images/icon.png" /> 
   9:      <!-- The jQuery UI theme that will be used by the components. -->
  10:      <link href="../themes/base/jquery-ui.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
  11:      <!-- jQuery runtime minified -->
  12:      <script src="../Scripts/jquery-1.9.1.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  13:      <!-- jQuery UI runtime minified, client-side javascript of the components.-->
  14:      <script src="../Scripts/jquery-ui-1.10.3.custom.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  15:      <!-- This style reference is needed only for the current example. -->
  16:      <link href="../css/example.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
  17:  </head>
  18:  <body>
  19:      <form id="form1" runat="server">
  20:      <fieldset>
  21:          <legend>Action</legend>
  22:          <div id="control">
  23:              <asp:CheckBox Text="Resizable" ID="IsResizable" runat="server" AutoPostBack="true"
  24:                  OnCheckedChanged="IsResizable_CheckedChanged" Checked="true" />
  25:          </div>
  26:      </fieldset>
  27:      <br />
  28:      <div>
  29:          <atom:AtomicAccordion ID="AtomicAccordion1" runat="server" AllowResize="true" AllowFillSpace="true">
  30:              <Items>
  31:                  <atom:AccordionItem Header="Fight Club">
  32:                      <Template>
  33:                          <img src="../images/movies/fight_club.jpg" alt="Fight Club" title="Fight Club" class="left-side-image" />
  34:                          <span>
  35:                              <p>
  36:                                  Fight Club is a 1999 American film based on the 1996 novel of the same name by Chuck
  37:                                  Palahniuk. The film was directed by David Fincher and stars Edward Norton, Brad
  38:                                  Pitt, and Helena Bonham Carter. Norton plays the unnamed protagonist, an "everyman"
  39:                                  who is discontented with his white-collar job. He forms a "fight club" with soap
  40:                                  maker Tyler Durden, played by Pitt, and becomes embroiled in a relationship with
  41:                                  him and a dissolute woman, Marla Singer, played by Bonham Carter.</p>
  42:                              <p>
  43:                                  Palahniuk's novel was optioned by 20th Century Fox producer Laura Ziskin, who hired
  44:                                  Jim Uhls to write the film adaptation. Fincher was one of four directors the producers
  45:                                  considered and hired him because of his enthusiasm for the film. Fincher developed
  46:                                  the script with Uhls and sought screenwriting advice from the cast and others in
  47:                                  the film industry. The director and the cast compared the film to Rebel Without
  48:                                  a Cause (1955) and The Graduate (1967). Fincher intended Fight Club's violence to
  49:                                  serve as a metaphor for the conflict between a generation of young people and the
  50:                                  value system of advertising. The director copied the homoerotic overtones from Palahniuk's
  51:                                  novel to make audiences uncomfortable and keep them from anticipating the twist
  52:                                  ending.</p>
  53:                              <p>
  54:                                  Studio executives did not like the film and they restructured Fincher's intended
  55:                                  marketing campaign to try to reduce anticipated losses. Fight Club failed to meet
  56:                                  the studio's expectations at the box office and received polarized reactions from
  57:                                  critics. It was cited as one of the most controversial and talked-about films of
  58:                                  1999. However, the film later found commercial success with its DVD release, which
  59:                                  established Fight Club as a cult film. Critical reception of Fight Club has since
  60:                                  become more positive.</p>
  61:                          </span>
  62:                      </Template>
  63:                  </atom:AccordionItem>
  64:                  <atom:AccordionItem Header="Casablanca">
  65:                      <Template>
  66:                          <img src="../images/movies/casablanca.jpg" alt="Casablanca" title="Casablanca" class="right-side-image" />
  67:                          <span>
  68:                              <p>
  69:                                  Casablanca is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz, starring
  70:                                  Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and Paul Henreid, and featuring Claude Rains, Conrad
  71:                                  Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre and Dooley Wilson. Set during World War II,
  72:                                  it focuses on a man torn between, in the words of one character, love and virtue.
  73:                                  He must choose between his love for a woman and helping her and her Czech Resistance
  74:                                  leader husband escape from the Vichy-controlled Moroccan city of Casablanca to continue
  75:                                  his fight against the Nazis.</p>
  76:                              <p>
  77:                                  Although it was an A-list film, with established stars and first-rate writers—Julius
  78:                                  J. Epstein, Philip G. Epstein and Howard Koch received credit for the screenplay—no
  79:                                  one involved with its production expected Casablanca to be anything out of the ordinary;
  80:                                  it was just one of hundreds of pictures produced by Hollywood every year. The film
  81:                                  was a solid, if unspectacular, success in its initial run, rushed into release to
  82:                                  take advantage of the publicity from the Allied invasion of North Africa a few weeks
  83:                                  earlier. Despite a changing assortment of screenwriters frantically adapting an
  84:                                  unstaged play and barely keeping ahead of production, and Bogart attempting his
  85:                                  first romantic lead role, Casablanca won three Academy Awards, including Best Picture.
  86:                                  Its characters, dialogue, and music have become iconic, and the film has grown in
  87:                                  popularity to the point that it now consistently ranks near the top of lists of
  88:                                  the greatest films of all time.</p>
  89:                          </span>
  90:                      </Template>
  91:                  </atom:AccordionItem>
  92:                  <atom:AccordionItem Header="The Matrix">
  93:                      <Template>
  94:                          <img src="../images/movies/the_matrix.jpg" title="The Matrix" alt="The Matrix" class="left-side-image" />
  95:                          <span>
  96:                              <p>
  97:                                  The Matrix is a 1999 American science fiction action film written and directed by
  98:                                  Larry and Andy Wachowski. The film stars Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne
  99:                                  Moss, Joe Pantoliano, and Hugo Weaving, and was first released in the United States
 100:                                  on March 31, 1999. The success of the film led to the release of two feature film
 101:                                  sequels, and the Matrix franchise was further expanded through the production of
 102:                                  comic books, video games, and animated short films.</p>
 103:                              <p>
 104:                                  The film depicts a future in which reality as perceived by most humans is actually
 105:                                  a simulated reality created by sentient machines to pacify and subdue the human
 106:                                  population, while their bodies' heat and electrical activity are used as an energy
 107:                                  source. Upon learning this, computer programmer "Neo" is drawn into a rebellion
 108:                                  against the machines, involving other people who have been freed from the "dream
 109:                                  world" and into reality.</p>
 110:                              <p>
 111:                                  The film contains many references to the cyberpunk and hacker subcultures; philosophical
 112:                                  and religious ideas such as Rene Descartes' evil genius, the Allegory of the Cave,
 113:                                  the brain in a vat thought experiment; and homages to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland,
 114:                                  Hong Kong action cinema, spaghetti westerns, dystopian fiction, and Japanese animation.</p>
 115:                          </span>
 116:                      </Template>
 117:                  </atom:AccordionItem>
 118:              </Items>
 119:          </atom:AtomicAccordion>
 120:      </div>
 121:      <br />
 122:      <sample:Source ID="Code" runat="server" />
 123:      </form>
 124:  </body>
 125:  </html>
   1:  using System;
   2:  using System.Collections.Generic;
   3:  using System.Linq;
   4:  using System.Web;
   5:  using System.Web.UI;
   6:  using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
   7:   
   8:  namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicAccordion
   9:  {
  10:      public partial class Resizable : System.Web.UI.Page
  11:      {
  12:          protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
  13:          {
  14:   
  15:          }
  16:   
  17:          protected void IsResizable_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
  18:          {
  19:              AtomicAccordion1.AllowResize = IsResizable.Checked;
  20:              AtomicAccordion1.AllowFillSpace = IsResizable.Checked;
  21:          }
  22:      }
  23:  }
   1:  Imports System
   2:  Imports System.Collections.Generic
   3:  Imports System.Linq
   4:  Imports System.Web
   5:  Imports System.Web.UI
   6:  Imports System.Web.UI.WebControls
   7:  Namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicAccordion
   8:      Public Partial Class Resizable
   9:          Inherits System.Web.UI.Page
  10:          Protected Sub Page_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs)
  11:          End Sub
  12:          Protected Sub IsResizable_CheckedChanged(sender As Object, e As EventArgs)
  13:              AtomicAccordion1.AllowResize = IsResizable.Checked
  14:              AtomicAccordion1.AllowFillSpace = IsResizable.Checked
  15:          End Sub
  16:      End Class
  17:  End Namespace