Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Wernher Magnus Maximilian, Freiherr von Braun (March 23, 1912 – June 16, 1977) was a German-born rocket scientist, aerospace engineer, space architect, and one of the leading figures in the development of rocket technology in Nazi Germany during World War II and, subsequently, the United States.

His 20s and early 30s, von Braun was the central figure in Germany's rocket development program, responsible for the design and realization of the V-2 combat rocket during World War II. After the war, he and some of his rocket team were taken to the United States as part of the then-secret Operation Paperclip. Von Braun worked on the United States Army intermediate range ballistic missile (IRBM) program before his group was assimilated by NASA, under which he served as director of the newly formed Marshall Space Flight Center and as the chief architect of the Saturn V launch vehicle, the superbooster that propelled the Apollo spacecraft to the Moon. According to one NASA source, he is "without doubt, the greatest rocket scientist in history". His crowning achievement was to lead the development of the Saturn V booster rocket that helped land the first men on the Moon in July 1969. In 1975 he received the National Medal of Science.

Thomas Alva Edison

Thomas Alva Edison

Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and a long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" (now Edison, New Jersey) by a newspaper reporter, he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and because of that, he is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.

Edison is the fourth most prolific inventor in history, holding 1,093 US patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany. He is credited with numerous inventions that contributed to mass communication and, in particular, telecommunications. These included a stock ticker, a mechanical vote recorder, a battery for an electric car, electrical power, recorded music and motion pictures.

His advanced work in these fields was an outgrowth of his early career as a telegraph operator. Edison originated the concept and implementation of electric-power generation and distribution to homes, businesses, and factories – a crucial development in the modern industrialized world. His first power station was on Manhattan Island, New York.

Henry Ford

Henry Ford

Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was an American industrialist, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production. His introduction of the Model T automobile revolutionized transportation and American industry. As owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with "Fordism": mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a global vision, with consumerism as the key to peace. His intense commitment to systematically lowering costs resulted in many technical and business innovations, including a franchise system that put dealerships throughout most of North America and in major cities on six continents. Ford left most of his vast wealth to the Ford Foundation but arranged for his family to control the company permanently.

Ford was also widely known for his pacifism during the first years of World War I and for being the publisher of antisemitic texts such as the book The International Jew.


Action

 


Info
   1:  <%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" Title="AtomicAccordion -- Client Side API" CodeBehind="ClientSideAPI.aspx.cs"
   2:      Inherits="Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicAccordion.ClientSideAPI" %>
   3:   
   4:  <%@ Register Assembly="Atom.Web" Namespace="Atom.Web.UI.WebControls" TagPrefix="atom" %>
   5:  <%@ Register Src="../Source.ascx" TagName="Source" TagPrefix="sample" %>
   6:  <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
   7:  <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
   8:  <head id="Header1" runat="server">
   9:      <link rel="Shortcut Icon" type="image/ico" href="../images/icon.png" /> 
  10:      <!-- The jQuery UI theme that will be used by the components. -->
  11:      <link href="../themes/base/jquery-ui.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
  12:      <!-- jQuery runtime minified -->
  13:      <script src="../Scripts/jquery-1.9.1.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  14:      <!-- jQuery UI runtime minified, client-side javascript of the components.-->
  15:      <script src="../Scripts/jquery-ui-1.10.3.custom.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  16:      <!-- This style reference is needed only for the current example. -->
  17:      <link href="../css/example.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
  18:      <script type="text/javascript">
  19:          $(document).ready(function () {
  20:              $('#previous').button().click(function () {
  21:                  var active = <%=AtomicAccordion1.ClientID%>.accordion("option", 'active') - 1;
  22:                  <%=AtomicAccordion1.ClientID%>.accordion("activate", active);
  23:              });
  24:   
  25:              $('#next').button().click(function () {
  26:                  var active = <%=AtomicAccordion1.ClientID%>.accordion("option", 'active') + 1;
  27:                  <%=AtomicAccordion1.ClientID%>.accordion("activate", active);
  28:              });
  29:          });
  30:   
  31:          function DisableButtons(event, ui){
  32:              $('#ItemSelector').val(ui.options.active);
  33:   
  34:              switch (ui.options.active)
  35:              {
  36:                case 0:   $('#previous').button("option", "disabled", true);
  37:                          $('#next').button("option", "disabled", false);
  38:                          break;
  39:   
  40:                case 2:   $('#previous').button("option", "disabled", false);
  41:                          $('#next').button("option", "disabled", true);
  42:                          break;
  43:   
  44:                default:  $('#previous').button("option", "disabled", false);
  45:                          $('#next').button("option", "disabled", false);
  46:              }
  47:          }
  48:   
  49:          function SelectItem() {
  50:              <%=AtomicAccordion1.ClientID%>.accordion("activate", parseInt($('#ItemSelector').val()));
  51:          }
  52:      </script>
  53:  </head>
  54:  <body>
  55:      <form id="form1" runat="server">
  56:      <div style="width: 100%; height: 220px; display: table">
  57:          <div style="width: 58%; float: left;">
  58:              <atom:AtomicAccordion ID="AtomicAccordion1" runat="server" AllowItemsReorder="true">
  59:                  <Items>
  60:                      <atom:AccordionItem Header="Wernher von Braun">
  61:                          <Template>
  62:                              <img src="../images/scientists/wernher_von_braun.jpg" alt="Wernher von Braun" title="Wernher von Braun"
  63:                                  class="right-side-image" /><span>
  64:                                      <p>
  65:                                          Wernher Magnus Maximilian, Freiherr von Braun (March 23, 1912 – June 16, 1977) was
  66:                                          a German-born rocket scientist, aerospace engineer, space architect, and one of
  67:                                          the leading figures in the development of rocket technology in Nazi Germany during
  68:                                          World War II and, subsequently, the United States.
  69:                                      </p>
  70:                                      <p>
  71:                                          His 20s and early 30s, von Braun was the central figure in Germany's rocket development
  72:                                          program, responsible for the design and realization of the V-2 combat rocket during
  73:                                          World War II. After the war, he and some of his rocket team were taken to the United
  74:                                          States as part of the then-secret Operation Paperclip. Von Braun worked on the United
  75:                                          States Army intermediate range ballistic missile (IRBM) program before his group
  76:                                          was assimilated by NASA, under which he served as director of the newly formed Marshall
  77:                                          Space Flight Center and as the chief architect of the Saturn V launch vehicle, the
  78:                                          superbooster that propelled the Apollo spacecraft to the Moon. According to one
  79:                                          NASA source, he is "without doubt, the greatest rocket scientist in history". His
  80:                                          crowning achievement was to lead the development of the Saturn V booster rocket
  81:                                          that helped land the first men on the Moon in July 1969. In 1975 he received the
  82:                                          National Medal of Science.
  83:                                      </p>
  84:                                  </span>
  85:                          </Template>
  86:                      </atom:AccordionItem>
  87:                      <atom:AccordionItem Header="Thomas Alva Edison">
  88:                          <Template>
  89:                              <img src="../images/scientists/thomas_edison.jpg" alt="Thomas Alva Edison" title="Thomas Alva Edison"
  90:                                  class="left-side-image" />
  91:                              <span>
  92:                                  <p>
  93:                                      Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor
  94:                                      and businessman. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the
  95:                                      world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and a long-lasting,
  96:                                      practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" (now Edison, New
  97:                                      Jersey) by a newspaper reporter, he was one of the first inventors to apply the
  98:                                      principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention,
  99:                                      and because of that, he is often credited with the creation of the first industrial
 100:                                      research laboratory.
 101:                                  </p>
 102:                                  <p>
 103:                                      Edison is the fourth most prolific inventor in history, holding 1,093 US patents
 104:                                      in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany.
 105:                                      He is credited with numerous inventions that contributed to mass communication and,
 106:                                      in particular, telecommunications. These included a stock ticker, a mechanical vote
 107:                                      recorder, a battery for an electric car, electrical power, recorded music and motion
 108:                                      pictures.
 109:                                  </p>
 110:                                  <p>
 111:                                      His advanced work in these fields was an outgrowth of his early career as a telegraph
 112:                                      operator. Edison originated the concept and implementation of electric-power generation
 113:                                      and distribution to homes, businesses, and factories – a crucial development in
 114:                                      the modern industrialized world. His first power station was on Manhattan Island,
 115:                                      New York.
 116:                                  </p>
 117:                              </span>
 118:                          </Template>
 119:                      </atom:AccordionItem>
 120:                      <atom:AccordionItem Header="Henry Ford">
 121:                          <Template>
 122:                              <img src="../images/scientists/henry_ford.jpg" alt="Henry Ford" title="Henry Ford"
 123:                                  class="right-side-image" /><span>
 124:                                      <p>
 125:                                          Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was an American industrialist, the founder
 126:                                          of the Ford Motor Company, and sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique
 127:                                          of mass production. His introduction of the Model T automobile revolutionized transportation
 128:                                          and American industry. As owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the
 129:                                          richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with "Fordism": mass
 130:                                          production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a
 131:                                          global vision, with consumerism as the key to peace. His intense commitment to systematically
 132:                                          lowering costs resulted in many technical and business innovations, including a
 133:                                          franchise system that put dealerships throughout most of North America and in major
 134:                                          cities on six continents. Ford left most of his vast wealth to the Ford Foundation
 135:                                          but arranged for his family to control the company permanently.
 136:                                      </p>
 137:                                      <p>
 138:                                          Ford was also widely known for his pacifism during the first years of World War
 139:                                          I and for being the publisher of antisemitic texts such as the book The International
 140:                                          Jew.
 141:                                      </p>
 142:                                  </span>
 143:                          </Template>
 144:                      </atom:AccordionItem>
 145:                  </Items>
 146:                  <ClientSideEvents OnSelectedIndexChanged="DisableButtons" />
 147:              </atom:AtomicAccordion>
 148:          </div>
 149:          <br />
 150:          <fieldset style="float: right; width: 37%;">
 151:              <legend>Action</legend>
 152:              <br />
 153:              <input id="previous" type="button" value="Previous" onclick="Change()" />
 154:              <input type="button" id="next" value="Next" onclick="Change()" />
 155:              <hr />
 156:              <label for="ItemSelector">
 157:                  Select item:</label>
 158:              &nbsp;<select id="ItemSelector" onchange="SelectItem()">
 159:                  <option value="0">Wernher von Braun</option>
 160:                  <option value="1" selected="selected">Thomas Alva Edison</option>
 161:                  <option value="2">Henry Ford</option>
 162:              </select>
 163:          </fieldset>
 164:      </div>
 165:      <br />
 166:      <sample:Source ID="Code" runat="server" />
 167:      </form>
 168:  </body>
 169:  </html>
   1:  using System;
   2:  using System.Collections.Generic;
   3:  using System.Linq;
   4:  using System.Web;
   5:  using System.Web.UI;
   6:  using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
   7:   
   8:  namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicAccordion
   9:  {
  10:      public partial class ClientSideAPI : System.Web.UI.Page
  11:      {
  12:          protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
  13:          {
  14:              AtomicAccordion1.SelectedIndex = 1;
  15:              
  16:          }
  17:      }
  18:  }
   1:  Imports System
   2:  Imports System.Collections.Generic
   3:  Imports System.Linq
   4:  Imports System.Web
   5:  Imports System.Web.UI
   6:  Imports System.Web.UI.WebControls
   7:  Namespace Atom.Website.Samples.AtomicAccordion
   8:      Public Partial Class ClientSideAPI
   9:          Inherits System.Web.UI.Page
  10:          Protected Sub Page_Load(sender As Object, e As EventArgs)
  11:              AtomicAccordion1.SelectedIndex = 1
  12:          End Sub
  13:      End Class
  14:  End Namespace